Web surveys are easy to run and often produce high engagement and great topics for conversation. If there's a subject or discussion that's particularly contested, or where you suspect showing the distribution of beliefs, usage or opinions can be revealing, check out a tool like SurveyMonkey (they have a small free version) or PollDaddy. Google Docs also offers a survey tool that's totally free, but not yet great in my view.
As a blogger, you're likely to be sending a lot of email out to others who use the web and have the power to help spread your work. Make sure you're not ignoring email as a channel, one-to-one though it may be. When given an opportunity in a conversation that's relevant, feel free to bring up your blog, a specific post or a topic you've written about. I find myself using blogging as a way to scalably answer questions - if I receive the same question many times, I'll try to make a blog post that answers it so I can simply link to that in the future.
Perhaps even more valuable is referencing the content of others. The biblical expression "give and ye shall receive," perfectly applies on the web. Other site owners will often receive Google Alerts (or, if they're using Moz, they might get Fresh Alerts :-) ) or look through their incoming referrers (as I showed above in tip #5) to see who's talking about them and what they're saying. Linking out is a direct line to earning links, social mentions, friendly emails and new relationships with those you reference. In its early days, this tactic was one of the best ways we earned recognition and traffic with the Moz blog and the power continues to this day.

I was googling around tonight and happened upon this great blog post. I appreciate the wealth of invaluable, understandable, and great methods to apply to improving ones blog or website provided within this post. I started working on several different website/blog ventures about six months ago. At times it can be very discouraging and overwhelming. I have even felt like folding up shop and burning the tent. I had read all 21 points, the thoughts and ideas were bouncing around in my head like the basketballs during tonights March Madness games. I reached the overtime bonus round with point 22 and smiled. Thanks for the great tips and the encouragement to keep pressing forward!

Use Google Analytics to see which websites are driving the most referral traffic. Find the forums and sites your target audience visits, and get active. Engage in discussion and post links or blog comments when appropriate. This is big – you can’t come off as spammy. You need to be seen as a valuable member of the community who is sharing something of merit. If someone mentions needing advice about scheduling healthy meal plans for each week, go ahead and point them to your resource! If they’re discussing their struggles in mastering the fine art of clowning, you can probably move along.
Post Panda, Authorship announcements and Google + Your World this post has never had more value. Leave it unread at your peril!There's a piece to add around using more tools to find the very best authorities for that content through outreach (and use of form letters as in Mike Kings Moz post from last year to improve conversion and uptake) but its pretty exhaustive and brilliantly captured. Thanks Rand.
If other blogs in your niche have earned references from sites around the web, there's a decent chance that they'll link to you as well. Conducting competitive link research can also show you what content from your competition has performed well and the strategies they may be using to market their work. To uncover these links, you'll need to use some tools.
As practice, try telling a story with your b-roll and planning out a shot sequence. For example, your subject might open a door from the hallway, walk into their office space, sit down at their desk, open their laptop, and begin typing. Seems simple, right? But a shot sequence showing this 10-second scenario might consist of six or more different b-roll clips.
I noticed you wrote that people could feel free to re-post the content with a mention or link. I recently had a large directory type website take a  dozen or so pages of content from my website and put it on a dozen or so pages on their website (along with content from other businesses) with a mention of my business (but not a link back to the pages that the content came from).
l       The article is on one page, not 21 pages that I have to click through.  By doing that you might be getting more page views, and perhaps more advertising opportunities.  I think it’s a bad tactic, however.  I hate waiting to transfer between all of those pages, and I’ll usually go somewhere else pretty quickly, unless the content is good.  Remember, if you’ve got great content, you can do just about anything.
When strategizing about who you're writing for, consider that audience's ability to help spread the word. Some readers will naturally be more or less active in evangelizing the work you do, but particular communities, topics, writing styles and content types regularly play better than others on the web. For example, great infographics that strike a chord ( like this one), beautiful videos that tell a story (like this one) and remarkable collections of facts that challenge common assumptions (like this one) are all targeted at audiences likely to share (geeks with facial hair, those interested in weight loss and those with political thoughts about macroeconomics respectively).
Enhance your writing. So now people are hooked on the appearance of your blog, but now you’ve got to provide stellar content to keep them around. In general, blogs should be written with a light-hearted tone and easy to understand vocabulary (unless it’s an academic or otherwise specific blog). Get your blog optimized for search engines (SEO optimized) by using common search queries throughout your writing. This will move your blog closer to the top of search engine result pages, and make people more likely to read your posts.

Once you've determined the communities where your soon-to-be-readers gather, you can start participating. Create an account, read what others have written and don't jump in the conversation until you've got a good feel for what's appropriate and what's not. I've written a post here about rules for comment marketing, and all of them apply. Be a good web citizen and you'll be rewarded with traffic, trust and fans. Link-drop, spam or troll and you'll get a quick boot, or worse, a reputation as a blogger no one wants to associate with.
Just like a customer testimonial or product review can help to build trust in your company, your brand, and your product, they can also help to boost engagement. Watching someone demonstrate how your product or service improved their efficiency or solved their problem is so much more believable (and memorable) than just reading an article about it.

Great write up for both the beginner blogger to advanced blogger.  21 great points that often are over looked or not focused upon when blogging.  I often use the following line when meeting asking if SEO is important "What good is a website if no one visits?"  The same could be said about a blog post. "What good is a blog post if it does not receive any views?"

Numerous niches in the blogosphere have a few "big sites" where key issues arise, get discussed and spawn conversations on other blogs and sites. Getting into the fray can be a great way to present your point-of-view, earn attention from those interested in the discussion and potentially get links and traffic from the industry leaders as part of the process.


As a blogger, you're likely to be sending a lot of email out to others who use the web and have the power to help spread your work. Make sure you're not ignoring email as a channel, one-to-one though it may be. When given an opportunity in a conversation that's relevant, feel free to bring up your blog, a specific post or a topic you've written about. I find myself using blogging as a way to scalably answer questions - if I receive the same question many times, I'll try to make a blog post that answers it so I can simply link to that in the future.


According to Google, “93 percent of millennials go to YouTube to learn how to do something.” Since YouTube is the second largest search engine after Google, and studies show “how-to content” earns more attention than any other category, this is a great opportunity to showcase the employees that your clients will actually come face to face with at some point. By demonstrating your professional expertise and allowing visitors a chance to become more familiar with your team, you’re killing two birds with one stone. Plus, these videos can encourage interaction between you and your viewers if you ask them for future topics of discussion, feedback, questions, etc. in the form of comments or messages.
I think you have created a great example today on how to increase not only new, but return blog traffic. Revisiting and updating outdated content and republishing it is a great way to get existing users to come back to your site. I wasnt around Moz in 2007 when the first version of this post was published. If I was and remembered that content It would have been one more reason for me to check this post out.
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