Once you've determined the communities where your soon-to-be-readers gather, you can start participating. Create an account, read what others have written and don't jump in the conversation until you've got a good feel for what's appropriate and what's not. I've written a post here about rules for comment marketing, and all of them apply. Be a good web citizen and you'll be rewarded with traffic, trust and fans. Link-drop, spam or troll and you'll get a quick boot, or worse, a reputation as a blogger no one wants to associate with.

Make sure your content is worth sharing and that you're actually phrasing it in terms that are useful for their followers/fans. (otherwise you're goign to come off ungeniune and spammy) In all fairness to, you'd want to develop relationships with the most influential rainmakers, ask them up front if there is anything you can do to help them out. Most of the time just asking is enough to impress them and develop a good rapport.
Thanks for the excellent post. I've been building my blog over the past year and a half and it's steadily improved. Lately it's been tuning things up one step at a time by reading comprehensive posts like this one (I do think this is the most comprehensive I've seen though) that have helped me plant more seeds for success. A ton of great tips, ESPECIALLY the last one. 
You provide some really great, detailed information here. We agree that sharing your posts are one of the best ways to make connections. Its also one of the best ways of getting your voice out there. Within small businesses especially, the use of sharing infromation is useful. All the aspects you have covered is essential information for any business in general. Thanks for posting this!

Excellent post. All the points mentioned are very important but I feel, the type of content is the most important. All other depends on what you write or how you write. So quality of content / style of representing is also very crucial to attract traffic. A well researched, unique and informative article is a must to start with these 22 points. Thank you for coming up with such brilliant article.
Did you know that organic engagement is highest on Facebook when posts contain videos? Or that simply including the word “video” in your email’s subject line can increase open rates by 19 percent? One company went as far as to test whether video thumbnails in an email newsletter would increase engagement and they found that it was quite successful. They reported that nearly 41 percent more people engaged with the email if it had a video thumbnail, as opposed to a static image or just text.

Likewise, when requesting a contribution, especially from someone with a significant industry profile, asking for a very specific piece of writing is much easier than getting them to write an entire piece from scratch of their own design. You should also present statistics that highlight the value of posting on your site - traffic data, social followers, RSS subscribers, etc. can all be very persuasie to a skeptical writer.
Be aware that Google's recently cracked down on guest blog posts and guest blog tools that focus exclusively on attracting links. While links can be a nice byproduct of a relevant, useful, and high quality contribution to another site, it can look very fishy to Google if all your links are coming from guest contributions that appear to have little relevance and low quality. Moz's Jen Lopez wrote an excellent summation of the new rules for guest posting here.
A note about shooting with two cameras: Your editor will need to sync the footage between the different views. To help them do this, clap your hands loudly in the view of both cameras right before you ask the first interview question … yes, just like an old fashion clapboard. Modern editing software has auto-sync features, but this loud clap will help you initially line up the clips.
I think you have created a great example today on how to increase not only new, but return blog traffic. Revisiting and updating outdated content and republishing it is a great way to get existing users to come back to your site. I wasnt around Moz in 2007 when the first version of this post was published. If I was and remembered that content It would have been one more reason for me to check this post out.

Likewise, when requesting a contribution, especially from someone with a significant industry profile, asking for a very specific piece of writing is much easier than getting them to write an entire piece from scratch of their own design. You should also present statistics that highlight the value of posting on your site - traffic data, social followers, RSS subscribers, etc. can all be very persuasie to a skeptical writer.
I love #22. Sometimes SEO companies say once you start blogging you will get all this traffic and grow your rankings, and with expectations like that it's hard after 8 months or so to keep blogging with minimal results. But I went back to SEOmoz's first posts and sure enough there were only 1 or 2 pageviews... Now look at this post alone with over 3000 tweets and hundreds of likes, comments and thumbs ups! 
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