I was googling around tonight and happened upon this great blog post. I appreciate the wealth of invaluable, understandable, and great methods to apply to improving ones blog or website provided within this post. I started working on several different website/blog ventures about six months ago. At times it can be very discouraging and overwhelming. I have even felt like folding up shop and burning the tent. I had read all 21 points, the thoughts and ideas were bouncing around in my head like the basketballs during tonights March Madness games. I reached the overtime bonus round with point 22 and smiled. Thanks for the great tips and the encouragement to keep pressing forward! 

Thanks for the excellent post. I've been building my blog over the past year and a half and it's steadily improved. Lately it's been tuning things up one step at a time by reading comprehensive posts like this one (I do think this is the most comprehensive I've seen though) that have helped me plant more seeds for success. A ton of great tips, ESPECIALLY the last one. 
#48 – Stitch Fix – Read review – If you are a fashionista with a creative eye, try Stitch Fix a company that allows you to share fashion tips with clients on the site. For work at home stylist, Stitch Fix offers a $16+ an hour pay. As a requirement, you must be 18 years of age or more and be ready to attend their off-site training before starting the job.

Hello; when I started reading this post, i fully expected to be horrified by how poorly i was doing. I was pleasantly surprised that I was already following many of your suggestions. The section on guest blogging was helpful as well as inspiring. It gave me something new to focus on. Many of the links mentioned will make following the suggestions much easier. And I'm most thankful for you reminding us not to give up. I have many good friends in my life who do that for me, but you can't imagine how much that bit of encouragement will help keep someone taking that next step until their blog catches on. thanks again, max
Let's look at a few simple reasons why the content is getting it to the top.l       It has a great title, with a number displayed prominently.  You find a lot of trash when you're looking around on the internet, and a large number tends to attract traffic.  You know you'll get a lot of key points, in this case 21 of them, and you can work your own content around those key points.
On the surface, the how of video marketing is pretty simple: Your brand creates videos that, in some way or another, promote your company, drive sales, raise awareness of your products or services, or engage your customers. In practice, it’s a little more complicated. Like many of your marketing efforts, video marketing is data driven, so you’ll want to monitor various metrics and track customer engagement.
Before someone can prepare an article like this, there must have been a level of understanding that has been attained; undaunted and formidable. I must appreciate what you have such knowledge, not only that, I also appreciate your efforts in reaching out to people with what you know. This written piece has been one of the best I've ever come across.
When you ask your friends which online video platform they use, the answer you probably hear the most is YouTube. YouTube is the largest video hosting platform, the second largest search platform after Google, and the third most visited website in the world. Every single day, people watch over five billion videos on YouTube. It's also free to upload your videos to YouTube and optimize them for search.

If you're someone who can produce graphics, take photos, illustrate or even just create funny doodles in MS Paint, you should leverage that talent on your blog. By uploading and hosting images (or using a third-party service like Flickr or Niice to embed your images with licensing requirements on that site), you create another traffic source for yourself via Image Search, and often massively improve the engagement and enjoyment of your visitors.

Add interesting images. People are visual, and they’re more likely to read an article or blog post if there are images to accompany it. If you’re a photographer or graphic designer, use your creative know-how to prepare images that fit the content of each individual blog post you create. If you’re not so artsy, use images from the web (with permission/linked sources) interspersed throughout your writing.
In addition to the entertainment aspect, more and more marketers are focusing on video marketing strategies because of how beneficial they are. Think about it from your own perspective for a minute. Would you rather read a long page full of text or watch a quick video to learn about a new product? Would you rather spend time reading about the steps of a company’s sales process or watch an animation to associate each step with a visual aid? If you’re like 80 percent of the population, you’d rather watch the video.
In this world of instant gratification, where it is all about getting followers today and RTs on our content, the concept of needing to make it through the first 6 to 18 months is a bit foreign to the modern blogger. This year I just launched a new blog and even with years of blogging experience I find myself pulling my hair out watching the slow trickle that is my new blog's traffic. Luckily I know (and get reminded by fantastic articles such as yours) that if I stick at it I will break the barrier eventually.
When pitching your guest post make it as easy as possible for the other party. When requesting to post, have a phenomenal piece of writing all set to publish that's never been shared before and give them the ability to read it. These requests get far more "yes" replies than asking for the chance to write with no evidence of what you'll contribute. At the very least, make an outline and write a title + snippet. 

Despite the immense power of the web to connect us all regardless of geography, in-person meetings are still remarkably useful for bloggers seeking to grow their traffic and influence. The people you meet and connect with in real-world settings are far more likely to naturally lead to discussions about your blog and ways you can help each other. This yields guest posts, links, tweets, shares, blogroll inclusion and general business development like nothing else.

Likewise, when requesting a contribution, especially from someone with a significant industry profile, asking for a very specific piece of writing is much easier than getting them to write an entire piece from scratch of their own design. You should also present statistics that highlight the value of posting on your site - traffic data, social followers, RSS subscribers, etc. can all be very persuasie to a skeptical writer.
Don't be discouraged if you ask and get a "no" or a "no response." As your profile grows in your niche, you'll have more opportunities, requests and an easier time getting a "yes," so don't take early rejections too hard and watch out - in many marketing practices, persistence pays, but pestering a blogger to write for them is not one of these (and may get your email address permanently banned from their inbox).
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