Participate in other blog communities. If you’re an avid reader of other blogs in your genre, you’ve probably noticed that people will comment with links to their own blogs at the end of popular posts. Commenting alone is a great way to get your name and ideas out in the world, but if you’re able to add a link to your blog as well, you’ll likely grab a few attentive readers. This is good, because the people who click through to your blog are likely some of the most loyal, possibly gaining you a solid following.
That's a screenshot of the AdAge Power 150, a list that's been maintained for years in the marketing world and receives an endless amount of discussion by those listed (and not listed). For example, why is SEOmoz's Twitter score only a "13" when we have so many more followers, interactions and retweets than many of those with higher scores? Who knows. But I know it's good for AdAge. :-)

Web surveys are easy to run and often produce high engagement and great topics for conversation. If there's a subject or discussion that's particularly contested, or where you suspect showing the distribution of beliefs, usage or opinions can be revealing, check out a tool like SurveyMonkey (they have a small free version) or PollDaddy. Google Docs also offers a survey tool that's totally free, but not yet great in my view.
Building trust within your digital community of potential clients, existing customers, and possible employee candidates should be a goal in your video marketing strategy. If you imagine a video marketing funnel, the top of the funnel type of videos should aim to introduce your company’s service or product and then explain how it can help solve a problem.

Post your blog on your hometown Patch, if you have one. Patch's Local Voices section is a free way for you to increase your local exposure. You have to follow the Patch guidelines (namely no overt solicitation of business, and the content should be of potential interest to readers...you can't be completely self serving!) Well written blogs can be linked back to your existing site to help drive more traffic to your site. 
Avoid overwhelming your readers. When you’re full of inspiration or you have a lot to say, it can be easy to create blog posts, designs, images, and content that are overwhelming to viewers. Try to keep each individual post relatively short, breaking up broad topics into multiple, concise articles. Additionally, avoid having tons of contrasting ads, images, and links spread around the borders of your page.
Be aware that Google's recently cracked down on guest blog posts and guest blog tools that focus exclusively on attracting links. While links can be a nice byproduct of a relevant, useful, and high quality contribution to another site, it can look very fishy to Google if all your links are coming from guest contributions that appear to have little relevance and low quality. Moz's Jen Lopez wrote an excellent summation of the new rules for guest posting here.
Last week I received an alert at MBG that one of my articles had been altered. I checked into it and found that the publisher added a ton of links to the article, all going to his own websites. That destroys the value of my one link, and it makes the article (with my name on it) look incredibly spammy. Now there is a poor looking article on the web which mentions my company - not what I intended.

When strategizing about who you're writing for, consider that audience's ability to help spread the word. Some readers will naturally be more or less active in evangelizing the work you do, but particular communities, topics, writing styles and content types regularly play better than others on the web. For example, great infographics that strike a chord ( like this one), beautiful videos that tell a story (like this one) and remarkable collections of facts that challenge common assumptions (like this one) are all targeted at audiences likely to share (geeks with facial hair, those interested in weight loss and those with political thoughts about macroeconomics respectively).

How to Get It: Check out K12 (K12.com) and Connections Academy (ConnectionsAcademy.com). Both organizations offer various benefits — including health insurance, retirement savings accounts and paid time off — depending on where you live. As in any job where you work with kids, there will be a background and reference check as well as interviews. You may also need to be licensed to teach in the state where the students reside.
Incorporate humor and emotion – It might surprise you, but videos that are downright funny can help with ad recall and brand awareness. Humans are designed to remember an encounter that sparks an emotional reaction, whether that’s fear, enjoyment, or humor. It makes sense—think about some ads that stick out to you: talking animals, laughing babies, epic travel ads, and other simple videos that might seem innocent enough, but are really doing an incredible job of capturing and retaining the attention of their audience.
A note about shooting with two cameras: Your editor will need to sync the footage between the different views. To help them do this, clap your hands loudly in the view of both cameras right before you ask the first interview question … yes, just like an old fashion clapboard. Modern editing software has auto-sync features, but this loud clap will help you initially line up the clips.

Did you know that 85% of Facebook video is watched with no sound? Many people watch videos in places where they can't turn the sound up, or where there's background noise. Those are two important reasons why video captions matter. And, of course, video captions matter for accessibility. Include captions, and you will improve you click-through rate as those with hearing loss or impairment can still understand your video content. Captions also help with SEO by providing text that search engines can find.
If you can identify groups that have high concentrations of the blue and orange circles in the diagram above, you dramatically improve the chances of reaching larger audiences and growing your traffic numbers. Targeting blog content at less-share-likely groups may not be a terrible decision (particularly if that's where you passion or your target audience lies), but it will decrease the propensity for your blog's work to spread like wildfire across the web.
After everything you just read about video marketing in 2018 and 2019, we hope you are in agreement that videos are going to be critical for your marketing strategy moving forward. Since people are more willing to watch and remember your message in a video format, instead of reading a blog post or looking at static images, you want to make sure you are putting your company and your brand in a position to reach your targeted audience.
If you’re using GKP, you can get a rough idea of the difficulty based on the domain authority (DA) of the search results when you Google that keyword. You can find DA with Moz Open Site Explorer. As a rule of thumb, if a lot of the posts have a DA of over 40 or 50, it’s probably going to be tough to outrank them. But using Ahrefs or SEMrush will give you a better picture.

Great post randfish. I am really new to blogging, as in literally a baby. I created my blog 3 weeks ago! I am not looking to make any money from blogging. All I want is to express myself and write and share thoughts and opinions with like minded people by commenting on modern life and the odd movie review. But the crazy world of social media and the blogosphere is just mind blowing! Your tips, however, are really useful and a great reference for me.

On one hand it is good in that it promotes my business on a very high traffic website, and there is a page on their website that has a link to my website (that was already there as a paid listing before the content was posted by them), but I am concerned about duplicate content. Will this hurt my search engine ranking for the content on those pages? I have been working very hard to get good search engine ranking, and some of those pages on my website are on the first page of Google for the relevant keywords, others are not.
If other blogs in your niche have earned references from sites around the web, there's a decent chance that they'll link to you as well. Conducting competitive link research can also show you what content from your competition has performed well and the strategies they may be using to market their work. To uncover these links, you'll need to use some tools.

Bottom line, overall strategy and data should drive your video marketing strategy. First, plan a solid strategy to develop video(s) for each level of your sales funnel. Outline the content and goals of each individual video. Determine what metrics will best determine a video’s success. Then, test. Analyze. Tweak your videos (and their deployment), when necessary. Work to make them more effective. And whatever you do, do do video; in 2017 and beyond, it’s the cornerstone of your brand’s marketing efforts.
Now that you've attracted video viewers and website visitors, the next step is to convert these visitors into leads. With most inbound marketing content, this means collecting some sort of contact information via a form. Video can aid this process by visualizing a solution to the buyer's problem, whether that's before the form on a landing page or as the offer itself. Overall, the goal of this kind of video is to educate and excite.
Focus on your design. The first thing people notice when they visit your blog, is the way it looks. And although the old adage goes that one shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, the same isn’t always true for a blog. If you want people to stay on your blog, you’ve got to hook them with an eye-catching design; once they’re interested in the appearance, they’ll start reading to see what you’re all about. 
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