Thanks for the excellent post. I've been building my blog over the past year and a half and it's steadily improved. Lately it's been tuning things up one step at a time by reading comprehensive posts like this one (I do think this is the most comprehensive I've seen though) that have helped me plant more seeds for success. A ton of great tips, ESPECIALLY the last one. 
Participate in other blog communities. If you’re an avid reader of other blogs in your genre, you’ve probably noticed that people will comment with links to their own blogs at the end of popular posts. Commenting alone is a great way to get your name and ideas out in the world, but if you’re able to add a link to your blog as well, you’ll likely grab a few attentive readers. This is good, because the people who click through to your blog are likely some of the most loyal, possibly gaining you a solid following.
#24 – Magoosh – If you are good at GMAT, GRE, TOEFL, SAT, and ACT, and tests, Magoosh is looking to hire online test prep experts to help students prepare for these papers. As a requirement, you must be an experienced BA or BS holder with high scores in GRE, SAT, GMAT. The standard pay for weekdays is $20 an hour and shoots up to $25 an hour over the weekends.
I just read half of this post and noticed that I have previously implemented several of these suggestions into my website.  However, I am such a beginner on this topic that I have a question and hope somebody can help me out with it.  The theme I uploaded to my wordpress blog has a link already installed in it for the 'RSS FEED.'  From what I understand, the 'RSS FEED' is basically a way for visitors to subscribe to receive any updates posted to your website.  How do I know if it is set up properly or not?

Hello; when I started reading this post, i fully expected to be horrified by how poorly i was doing. I was pleasantly surprised that I was already following many of your suggestions. The section on guest blogging was helpful as well as inspiring. It gave me something new to focus on. Many of the links mentioned will make following the suggestions much easier. And I'm most thankful for you reminding us not to give up. I have many good friends in my life who do that for me, but you can't imagine how much that bit of encouragement will help keep someone taking that next step until their blog catches on. thanks again, max
As you can see, there's all sorts of great insights to be gleaned by looking at where visits originate, analyzing how they were earned and trying to repeat the successes, focus on the high quality and high traffic sources and put less effort into marketing paths that may not be effective. In this example, it's pretty clear that Facebook and Twitter are both excellent channels. StumbleUpon sends a lot of traffic, but they don't stay very long (averaging only 36 seconds vs. the general average of 4 minutes!).
A note about shooting with two cameras: Your editor will need to sync the footage between the different views. To help them do this, clap your hands loudly in the view of both cameras right before you ask the first interview question … yes, just like an old fashion clapboard. Modern editing software has auto-sync features, but this loud clap will help you initially line up the clips.
Avoid overwhelming your readers. When you’re full of inspiration or you have a lot to say, it can be easy to create blog posts, designs, images, and content that are overwhelming to viewers. Try to keep each individual post relatively short, breaking up broad topics into multiple, concise articles. Additionally, avoid having tons of contrasting ads, images, and links spread around the borders of your page.
I was googling around tonight and happened upon this great blog post. I appreciate the wealth of invaluable, understandable, and great methods to apply to improving ones blog or website provided within this post. I started working on several different website/blog ventures about six months ago. At times it can be very discouraging and overwhelming. I have even felt like folding up shop and burning the tent. I had read all 21 points, the thoughts and ideas were bouncing around in my head like the basketballs during tonights March Madness games. I reached the overtime bonus round with point 22 and smiled. Thanks for the great tips and the encouragement to keep pressing forward!
Focus on your target audience. Although you likely want anyone and everyone to start reading your blog, typically only a specific target audience will make up the primary readership. Look at popular blogs that are similar to yours or how you want your to be, and emulate the ways in which they hook their audience on content. By creating specific, detailed content rather than general, vague content, your target audience will be more likely to become repeat readers, and to share your blog on a regular basis.
The major social networking sites aren't alone in their power to send traffic to a blog. Social community sites like Reddit (which now receives more than 2 billion! with a "B"! views each month), StumbleUpon, Pinterest, Tumblr, Care2 (for nonprofits and causes), GoodReads (books), Ravelry (knitting), Newsvine (news/politics) and many, many more (Wikipedia maintains a decent, though not comprehensive list here).
As practice, try telling a story with your b-roll and planning out a shot sequence. For example, your subject might open a door from the hallway, walk into their office space, sit down at their desk, open their laptop, and begin typing. Seems simple, right? But a shot sequence showing this 10-second scenario might consist of six or more different b-roll clips.
Post at the right time. If your target audience is adult males over the age of 50, it probably won’t be good to always post new content at midnight. Similarly, it’s not incredibly helpful if you post about how to make the perfect ‘New Year’s Eve’ decorations for a party, the day of/after New Year’s Eve. Keep your target audience and your content in mind when you choose a date and time to post an update.
Now that you've attracted video viewers and website visitors, the next step is to convert these visitors into leads. With most inbound marketing content, this means collecting some sort of contact information via a form. Video can aid this process by visualizing a solution to the buyer's problem, whether that's before the form on a landing page or as the offer itself. Overall, the goal of this kind of video is to educate and excite.
As practice, try telling a story with your b-roll and planning out a shot sequence. For example, your subject might open a door from the hallway, walk into their office space, sit down at their desk, open their laptop, and begin typing. Seems simple, right? But a shot sequence showing this 10-second scenario might consist of six or more different b-roll clips.

Numerous niches in the blogosphere have a few "big sites" where key issues arise, get discussed and spawn conversations on other blogs and sites. Getting into the fray can be a great way to present your point-of-view, earn attention from those interested in the discussion and potentially get links and traffic from the industry leaders as part of the process.
In this world of instant gratification, where it is all about getting followers today and RTs on our content, the concept of needing to make it through the first 6 to 18 months is a bit foreign to the modern blogger. This year I just launched a new blog and even with years of blogging experience I find myself pulling my hair out watching the slow trickle that is my new blog's traffic. Luckily I know (and get reminded by fantastic articles such as yours) that if I stick at it I will break the barrier eventually.
Just be authentic in your answer, particularly if you're linking. If you'd like to see some examples, I answer a lot of questions at Quora, frequently include relevant links, but am rarely accused of spamming or link dropping because it's clearly about providing relevant value, not just getting a link for SEO (links on most user-contributed sites are "nofollow" anyway, meaning they shouldn't pass search-engine value). There's a dangerous line to walk here, but if you do so with tact and candor, you can earn a great audience from your participation.
Link to yourself. If you have a stockpile of blog posts you’ve already published, don’t hesitate to give them a shout-out in your new posts! Readers will be drawn deeper into your blog with each link, and be more likely to stick around and explore a bit if you provide plenty of links to your other posts. Insert them inconspicuously into your writing by turning words or phrases in a sentence into colored hyperlinks that don’t detract/distract from the rest of your content.[1]

If you can identify groups that have high concentrations of the blue and orange circles in the diagram above, you dramatically improve the chances of reaching larger audiences and growing your traffic numbers. Targeting blog content at less-share-likely groups may not be a terrible decision (particularly if that's where you passion or your target audience lies), but it will decrease the propensity for your blog's work to spread like wildfire across the web.


I have to say though, that (like the comment above) my favourite one was #22. Just when my brain was a little frazzled, seeing (and I mean actually visually seeing) your wife's success with her Everywhereist blog is so encouraging! If you've got something to say all you want is for people to hear it and join in the conversation and there's so many of us out there waiting to connect. It's really inspiring.
Post your blog on your hometown Patch, if you have one. Patch's Local Voices section is a free way for you to increase your local exposure. You have to follow the Patch guidelines (namely no overt solicitation of business, and the content should be of potential interest to readers...you can't be completely self serving!) Well written blogs can be linked back to your existing site to help drive more traffic to your site. 
In the section on preparing talent, we discussed how to record your script in short sections. If the editor were to stitch these sections together side-by-side, the subject's face and hands might abruptly switch between clips. This is called a jump cut, and for editors, it poses an interesting challenge. Thankfully, this is where b-roll comes in handy, to mask these jump cuts.
Focus on your design. The first thing people notice when they visit your blog, is the way it looks. And although the old adage goes that one shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, the same isn’t always true for a blog. If you want people to stay on your blog, you’ve got to hook them with an eye-catching design; once they’re interested in the appearance, they’ll start reading to see what you’re all about.
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